The YUNiversity

Department of English Grammar

Grammar bosses for Gen tl;dr

More About Us

Grammar bosses for Gen tl;dr.
G-DRAGON is our muse; Gerard Way is our hero.

about.me/The_YUNiversity
medium.com/@The_YUNiversity
TheYUNiversityArchive.tumblr.com
ask.fm/The_YUNiversity

Close

Blog

Previous Next

What’s up with “inquiry” and “enquiry”?

image

We get asked about “enquire" and "inquire" (and "enquiry" and "inquiry”) frequently—both here and on Twitter.

imageimage

Similarly, “enquire” and “enquirer” are more common in British English, while “inquire” and “inquirer” are more common in American English.

image

image

Read More

What’s up with “good” and “well”?

This is a topic that people assume they know about … until they get it wrong. So, just to be safe, let’s go over the difference:

1. “Good" is an adjective and a noun.

2. “Well" is an adverb and an adjective.

Here are simple examples in which “good” and “well” are often used:

  • Jim dances well.
  • Jim is a good dancer.

In this post, we will focus on the situations in which “good” and “well” become confusing, namely after linking verbs:

We use “good” after linking verbs such as be, taste, sound, smelllook, seem, and feel if we want to describe the subject, not the action of the verb:

  • That episode of “How I Met Your Mother” wasn’t good at all.
  • The answer choice seemed good, but it was wrong.
  • Your suggestion sounds good to me.
  • I feel good this morning. (Translation: I am happy this morning.)

image

We use “well" after the linking verbs be, feel, look, and seem (not the others listed above) if we want to use the adjective form of “well,” which means “healthy”:

  • Jim feels well enough to go to school today. (Jim is healthy enough to go to school today.)
  • Jake was well yesterday, but he is sick today. (Jake was healthy yesterday, but he is sick today.)

image

Pay attention to the following sentences:

  • I did WELL. = I did a good job; I succeeded.
  • I did GOOD (noun). = I performed acts of charity and kindness.
  • Jo looks WELL. = Jo looks healthy.
  • Jo looks GOOD. = Jo is attractive.
  • I feel WELL. = I don’t feel sick.
  • I feel GOOD. = I am happy.

Read More

Back to Top

Twitter

Previous Next
Back to Top

Got a question?

Previous Next
Back to Top

Submit something cool

Previous Next
Back to Top

Instagram

Previous Next
Load More Photos
Back to Top

Vanity by Pixel Union