Posts tagged BRITISH ENGLISH

Yo, Grammar: What’s up with “I’ve got” and “I’ve gotten”?

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When it comes to “got” or “gotten” when they mean “received,” the really simplistic answer is as follows.

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"Has / have / had gotten" is more common in American English:

  • have gotten Christmas presents from my parents for the past 12 years.

"Has / have / had got" is much more common in British English:

  • have got a memorable education at this school.

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But of course, it’s not quite so simple if we consider all the different angles:

Besides received, “got” could also mean have or to possess, and in this case, it’s always has / have / had got:

  • I’ve got (have got) a lot of money in the bank.
  • The Doctor has got lots of cool things inside the TARDIS.

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But in that usage, it’s perfectly fine (and perhaps even better) to omit “got” and just use “has” or “have”:

  • have a lot of money in the bank.
  • The Doctor has lots of cool things inside the TARDIS.

Lastly, we sometimes use has / have / had “got” (not “gotten”) for emphasis:

  • have got to stop procrastinating!
  • Jo has got to break her smoking habit!
  • Flame Princess has got to learn to control her temper.

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And even in this usage, we can easily remove “got” or use “must” instead. In formal writing, it’s better to use “must” or just “has to” or “have to.”

Cheers. ヽ(^。^)丿

(Hogwarts GIF source: Tylers Back; Eleventh Doctor GIF source: Colin Baker Street)

What’s up with “oriented” and “orientated” (and “disoriented” and “disorientated”)?

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If you live where British English is the norm, you would most likely use orientated and disorientated.

  • Jim frequently finds himself disorientated when he comes up out of the Underground in London.
  • The Doctor’s revelation left Clara Oswin Oswald shocked and utterly disorientated.

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If you live where American English in the norm, you would almost certainly use oriented and disoriented:

  • The powerful drug left James completely disoriented.
  • Barney Gumble often feels disoriented after a long night of drinking at Moe’s.

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(Clara Oswald GIF source: men on waves; Barney Gumble GIF source: imgur)

Yo, Writing: What’s up with punctuations in and around quotation marks?

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Before we get started, the answer to your question actually depends on where you live.

More specifically, THE FOLLOWING RULES ARE FOR AMERICAN ENGLISH, which is very strict when it comes to putting commas and periods in and around quotation marks. British English uses rules that allow the writer to determine whether the period or comma belong with the quotation or are part of the larger sentence. (See below.)

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If you want to be “safe," go with the rules for American English: if nothing else, it’s consistent and "predictable." (See what we did with the punctuations after "safe" and "predictable"?)

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Cheers.

(via theyuniversity)

Yo, English: What’s up with “practice” and “practise”?

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Let’s practice/practise drawing a mustache on Mr. Tomlinson’s face.

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Not bad. After a little practice, it’ll be perfect.

(Louis Tomlinson mustache GIF source: gifboom)

(Source: theyuniversity, via theyuniversity)

Yo, English: What’s up with British and American spelling?

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For a longer list of such words, click here. The Oxford Dictionaries provides both a list and an explanation for the differences.

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(Patrick Star GIF source: Travel Freak)

(Source: theyuniversity, via theyuniversity)

What’s up with punctuations in and around quotation marks?

Before we get started, the answer to your question actually depends on where you live.

More specifically, THE FOLLOWING RULES ARE FOR AMERICAN ENGLISH, which is very strict when it comes to putting commas and periods in and around quotation marks. British English uses rules that allow the writer to determine whether the period or comma belong with the quotation or are part of the larger sentence. (See below.)

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If you want to be “safe," go with the rules for American English: if nothing else, it’s consistent and "predictable." (See what we did with the punctuations after "safe" and "predictable"?)

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Cheers.

I'm so confused- is specialised spelled in British English whereas specialized is in American English? Or vise-versa?

Specialized" is the American spelling. We Americans prefer the "z" spelling of words, as in the following:

  • realize
  • analyze
  • recognize
  • authorize
  • organize

In British spelling, the “s” spelling is preferred:

  • specialised
  • realise
  • analyse
  • recognise
  • authorise
  • organise

These preferences apply also to different forms of the word:

  • In American English → realization, authorization, specialization
  • In British English → realisation, authorisation, specialisation

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The Eleventh Doctor specializes / specialises in cool accessories, e.g., glasses, fezzes, and Stetsons.

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