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Posts tagged BRITISH ENGLISH

What’s up with British and American spelling?

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For a longer list of such words, click here. That article we wrote on Medium has a link to 1,800 words that are spelled / spelt differently between American and British English.

Get off the aeroplane’s wing, Patrick. An airplane (or its wing) is no place for a starfish.

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They are both the past tense form of “learn.”

"Learned" is used in American English; "learnt" (and many other past tense verbs that end in -t) is commonly used in British English. For all intents and purposes, they can be used interchangeably. Just don’t switch back and forth: doing so will create an unnecessary distraction for your reader.

However, “learned” can also be an adjective that means scholarly or educated. “Learnt” cannot be used as an adjective.

Anonymous asked:

Hello, thank you for everything, you are awesome! I was wondering, what's up with dreamed and dreamt?

I answered:

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The words on the left side are the way they’re spelled in American English; the words on the right are how they’re spelt in British English.

If you’re interested in other words that are spelled differently (but are the same words), click here.

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(Sherlock GIF source: All the Sherlock GIFs)

Yo, Grammar: What’s up with “inquiry” and “enquiry”?

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We get asked about “enquire" and "inquire" (and "enquiry" and "inquiry”) frequently—both here and on Twitter.

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Similarly, “enquire” and “enquirer” are more common in British English, while “inquire” and “inquirer” are more common in American English.

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(Sherlock GIF source: I’m nobody)

Yo, Grammar: What’s up with “I’ve got” and “I’ve gotten”?

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When it comes to “got” or “gotten” when they mean “received,” the really simplistic answer is as follows.

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"Has / have / had gotten" is more common in American English:

  • have gotten Christmas presents from my parents for the past 12 years.

"Has / have / had got" is much more common in British English:

  • have got a memorable education at this school.

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But of course, it’s not quite so simple if we consider all the different angles:

Besides received, “got” could also mean have or to possess, and in this case, it’s always has / have / had got:

  • I’ve got (have got) a lot of money in the bank.
  • The Doctor has got lots of cool things inside the TARDIS.

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But in that usage, it’s perfectly fine (and perhaps even better) to omit “got” and just use “has” or “have”:

  • have a lot of money in the bank.
  • The Doctor has lots of cool things inside the TARDIS.

Lastly, we sometimes use has / have / had “got” (not “gotten”) for emphasis:

  • have got to stop procrastinating!
  • Jo has got to break her smoking habit!
  • Flame Princess has got to learn to control her temper.

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And even in this usage, we can easily remove “got” or use “must” instead. In formal writing, it’s better to use “must” or just “has to” or “have to.”

Cheers. ヽ(^。^)丿

(Hogwarts GIF source: Tylers Back; Eleventh Doctor GIF source: Colin Baker Street)

What’s up with “oriented” and “orientated” (and “disoriented” and “disorientated”)?

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If you live where British English is the norm, you would most likely use orientated and disorientated.

  • Jim frequently finds himself disorientated when he comes up out of the Underground in London.
  • The Doctor’s revelation left Clara Oswin Oswald shocked and utterly disorientated.

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If you live where American English in the norm, you would almost certainly use oriented and disoriented:

  • The powerful drug left James completely disoriented.
  • Barney Gumble often feels disoriented after a long night of drinking at Moe’s.

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(Clara Oswald GIF source: men on waves; Barney Gumble GIF source: imgur)

Yo, Writing: What’s up with punctuations in and around quotation marks?

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Before we get started, the answer to your question actually depends on where you live.

More specifically, THE FOLLOWING RULES ARE FOR AMERICAN ENGLISH, which is very strict when it comes to putting commas and periods in and around quotation marks. British English uses rules that allow the writer to determine whether the period or comma belong with the quotation or are part of the larger sentence. (See below.)

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If you want to be “safe," go with the rules for American English: if nothing else, it’s consistent and "predictable." (See what we did with the punctuations after "safe" and "predictable"?)

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Cheers.

What’s up with punctuations in and around quotation marks?

Before we get started, the answer to your question actually depends on where you live.

More specifically, THE FOLLOWING RULES ARE FOR AMERICAN ENGLISH, which is very strict when it comes to putting commas and periods in and around quotation marks. British English uses rules that allow the writer to determine whether the period or comma belong with the quotation or are part of the larger sentence. (See below.)

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If you want to be “safe," go with the rules for American English: if nothing else, it’s consistent and "predictable." (See what we did with the punctuations after "safe" and "predictable"?)

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Cheers.

theimpossiblefan asked:

I'm so confused- is specialised spelled in British English whereas specialized is in American English? Or vise-versa?

I answered:

Specialized" is the American spelling. We Americans prefer the "z" spelling of words, as in the following:

  • realize
  • analyze
  • recognize
  • authorize
  • organize

In British spelling, the “s” spelling is preferred:

  • specialised
  • realise
  • analyse
  • recognise
  • authorise
  • organise

These preferences apply also to different forms of the word:

  • In American English → realization, authorization, specialization
  • In British English → realisation, authorisation, specialisation

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The Eleventh Doctor specializes / specialises in cool accessories, e.g., glasses, fezzes, and Stetsons.

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