Posts tagged PUNCTUATION

Yo, Grammar: What’s up with the colon?

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The most important thing to know about colons is that the statement before the colon has to be a complete sentence, i.e., an independent clause.

In that regard, they are very much like semicolonsCLICK ON THIS LINK, ANON. (⌐■_■)

However, unlike semicolons, colons do not have to be followed by complete sentences. In that sense, they are “superior” to semicolons. (Perhaps that’s why semicolons have the “inferior” prefix “semi-” [half; partly].)

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The colon is a versatile punctuation that does a lot more than start a list of items.

Put it to good use in your next post, tweet, or—best of all—your essay!

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(Dave Strider GIF Source: Homestuck Reaction GIFS)

(Source: theyuniversity, via theyuniversity)

The comma is probably the most misunderstood (yet most commonly used) punctuation.
For a thorough explanation on the proper use of the comma, read this excellent piece from the New York Times called “The Most Comma Mistakes.”

If you prefer a tl;dr version, read this Quick Guide to Commas from the always excellent Purdue OWL.
Cheers.

(Ralph GIF source: GIPHY)

The comma is probably the most misunderstood (yet most commonly used) punctuation.

For a thorough explanation on the proper use of the comma, read this excellent piece from the New York Times called “The Most Comma Mistakes.”

If you prefer a tl;dr version, read this Quick Guide to Commas from the always excellent Purdue OWL.

Cheers.

(Ralph GIF source: GIPHY)

(Source: theyuniversity, via theyuniversity)

Yo, Grammar: What’s up with the semicolon?

First of all, thanks for love, Anon.

The semicolon is one of the most misunderstood, misused, and underappreciated punctuations.

This famous quote from Kurt Vonnegut might have something to do with it:

On the other hand, standardized tests (especially the ACT and SAT) insist that you know how to use a semicolon properly. Many esteemed newspaper editors also endorse the semicolon.

Kurt Vonnegut’s diatribe notwithstanding, let’s examine what a semicolon is and does:

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In other words, a semicolon combines two sentences together, and in doing so, connects their ideas more closely.

Therefore, there is one important caveat to consider when using a semicolon as a period:

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In other words, a semicolon can prevent this: I’ve seen Katy Perry perform in Austin, TX, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA, and San Diego, CA. #CommaOverdose

It is possible to overuse semicolons; combining sentences in close proximity with semicolons can make your writing seem endless; therefore, use semicolons when they’re needed (and effective). #SeeWhatIDidThere

Cheers.

(Supernatural GIF source: The Dreamer)

(Source: theyuniversity, via theyuniversity)

Yo, Grammar: What’s up with the colon?

image

The most important thing to know about colons is that the statement before the colon has to be a complete sentence, i.e., an independent clause.

They are very much like semicolons in that regard; however, unlike semicolons, colons do not have to be followed by complete sentences. In that sense, they are “superior” to semicolons. (Perhaps that’s why semicolons have the “inferior” prefix “semi-” [half; partly].)

image

image

image

The colon is a versatile punctuation that does a lot more than start a list of items.

Put it to good use.

image

Cheers.

(Source: theyuniversity, via theyuniversity)

The comma is probably the most misunderstood (yet most commonly used) punctuation.
For a thorough explanation on the proper use of the comma, read this excellent piece from the New York Times called “The Most Comma Mistakes.”

If you prefer a TL;DR version, read this Quick Guide to Commas from the always excellent Purdue OWL.
Cheers.

The comma is probably the most misunderstood (yet most commonly used) punctuation.

For a thorough explanation on the proper use of the comma, read this excellent piece from the New York Times called “The Most Comma Mistakes.”

If you prefer a TL;DR version, read this Quick Guide to Commas from the always excellent Purdue OWL.

Cheers.

(Source: theyuniversity, via theyuniversity)

What’s up with … the ellipsis?

As an introduction, the “dot-dot-dot” ( … ) is known as an ellipsis. It is used primarily

  1. to omit certain words or phrases from a quotation or citation
  2. to indicate a pause or break in the writer’s train of thought

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If you are using the ellipsis to omit words from the original sentence, make sure that the words you take out don’t change the meaning of the original sentence.

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In the following, we can see that in the correct usage, the original meaning of the sentence remains intact, whereas in the incorrect usage, the original meaning has warped into something sinister and pervy.

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When it comes to using an ellipsis to indicate a pause or break in the writer’s thought, just don’t overdo it:

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  • Click HERE for an excellent post on the ellipsis, including how to use them in formal writing (e.g., in citing quotations).
  • The plural of “ellipsis” is “ellipses.”
  • If an ellipsis ends a sentence, you put an extra period at the end, i.e., four periods.

What’s up with punctuations in and around quotation marks?

Before we get started, the answer to your question actually depends on where you live.

More specifically, THE FOLLOWING RULES ARE FOR AMERICAN ENGLISH, which is very strict when it comes to putting commas and periods in and around quotation marks. British English uses rules that allow the writer to determine whether the period or comma belong with the quotation or are part of the larger sentence. (See below.)

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If you want to be “safe," go with the rules for American English: if nothing else, it’s consistent and "predictable." (See what we did with the punctuations after "safe" and "predictable"?)

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Cheers.

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