Posts tagged SPELLING

What’s up with “oriented” and “orientated” (and “disoriented” and “disorientated”)?

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If you live where British English is the norm, you would most likely use orientated and disorientated.

  • Jim frequently finds himself disorientated when he comes up out of the Underground in London.
  • The Doctor’s revelation left Clara Oswin Oswald shocked and utterly disorientated.

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If you live where American English in the norm, you would almost certainly use oriented and disoriented:

  • The powerful drug left James completely disoriented.
  • Barney Gumble often feels disoriented after a long night of drinking at Moe’s.

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(Clara Oswald GIF source: men on waves; Barney Gumble GIF source: imgur)

Anonymous asked:
I'm a French speaker, trying to learn English (really helpful blog!) and I was wondering, why do I see tonite and tonight both used so often?

Bonjour!

Here’s the simple answer to your question:

  • Tonight → ✓.
  • Tonite → X. (ಠ_ಠ)

Tonite and nite are informal and nonstandard. They are completely inappropriate in formal writing (essays, reports, etc.). They are OK in cartoons, comic books, tweets, Facebook posts, and other informal contexts.

But “tonite" is only one character shorter than "tonight,” so … 

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Yo, Spelling: What’s up with “until,” “till,” “‘til,” and “til”?

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Not surprisingly, this is a very popular question.

After reading the following post, nod your head (if you get it and agree with it).

Convince yourself to always write “until" (5 letters), instead of "till" (4 letters), "'till" (5 characters), "'til" (4 characters), "til" (3 letters), or "'til" (4 characters). "Until" is barely longer than all of the other options, and more importantly, no one will be tempted to go all Grammar Nazi on your usage.

TLDR:

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You will undoubtedly find “'til" in published works, but those are likely to be novels and other fictional works, i.e., in less formal settings. You are unlikely to find it in a newspaper article or a Ph.D. dissertation.

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Until next time … 

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Yo, Grammar: What’s up with “thru” and “through”?

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Through" is the correct, formal spelling. "Thru" is informal and inappropriate in anything for school.

Spelling “through” as “thru” is about as appropriate as spelling “night" as "nite”:

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About the only places you should use “thru" are in texts to friends and on social media sites (unless you need—or want—to come across as being professional). Of course, you can also use "thru" if you own a fast food restaurant:

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In closing, unless you are desperate to save THREE characters, just use “through.”

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