The YUNiversity

Department of English Grammar

Grammar bosses for Gen tl;dr

More About Us

Grammar bosses for Gen tl;dr.
G-DRAGON is our muse; Gerard Way is our hero.

about.me/The_YUNiversity
medium.com/@The_YUNiversity
TheYUNiversityArchive.tumblr.com
ask.fm/The_YUNiversity

Close

Blog

Previous Next

From College Essay Guy: What’s up with early action and early decision?

After a brief summer hiatus, College Essay Guy is back. This time, he’ll be tackling the difference between early action and early decision.

image

Many colleges offer early admission programs that let students apply earlier in the year (usually in November) and get a decision from the college earlier as well (by the middle of January).

Here’s a useful, albeit simple chart from the College Board:

image

As you can see, early decision is binding, which means that you’re making a commitment to enroll at the school if you’re accepted. It’s like signing a contract. If you get in, you’re going there. Therefore, you should apply early decision only for your #1 choice.

image

On the other hand, early action is non-binding, which means that you can (in most cases) apply early action to more than one college, but you don’t have to accept an offer of admission any earlier than usual.

WHY DO COLLEGES LIKE EARLY ACTION AND EARLY DECISION?

It gives them an idea of what kind of students will be applying. They also like feeling loved (as the applicant’s #1 choice).

WHY DO STUDENTS LIKE EARLY ACTION AND EARLY DECISION?

  1. Higher Acceptance Rates: At Yale, for example, the regular acceptance rate for the class of 2018 was 6.26%, but the acceptance rate for early action was 15.47%. This is true at many schools.
  2. A Second Chance*: Students who are not accepted via early action or early decision are considered again during the regular admissions period. Essentially, they have a second chance to get in.
  3. Reward for Diligence: Students who get their applications and essays finished early (instead of waiting until the last minute) get rewarded with benefits 1 and 2. Moreover, they have less stress to deal with during the holiday season, when most students are frantically writing essays and filling in their applications.

*NOTE: If you are flatly rejected by a school during the early action or early decision phase (because you are vastly under-qualified), your application will NOT be considered again. If you plan to apply early, do so only if you have a decent chance of getting in, i.e., you meet most, if not all, requirements.

Good luck!

image

image

Yo, Lit Terms: What’s up with metonymy and synecdoche?

Literary terms are fun.

Let’s start with metonymy:

image

Other examples of metonymy include the following:

  • The pen (the written word) is mightier than the sword (military might).
  • What’s your favorite dish (entree, food) at the Chinese restaurant?

This leaves us with synecdoche [see-NECK-duh-kee]:

image

image

A very famous example of synecdoche is “All hands on deck!" (Translation: Everyone’s help is needed!) Hands (the part) represents everyone, i.e., people (the whole thing).

We hope this comes in handy in your rhetoric or AP Language class.

What’s up with “eponyms” (and “proprietary eponyms”)?

Google Inc., for whom Google Search was named, should know something about this topic.

image

There are certain brand names that are so famous that people are more aware of them than the technical names of the products themselves.

For instance, teachers and office workers who need to make duplicates of printed documents are likely to make “Xerox copies” (named after Xerox Corporation Ltd., one of the first companies to make photocopying machines) instead of “photocopies” (the generic name). Similarly, people who have to blow their noses are likely to grab a box of “Kleenex” instead of “facial tissues.”

image

image

image

Speaking of -nym words, “Batman” is an “aptronym" (a name that suits its owner) and a "pseudonym" (a fake name, in his case, of Bruce Wayne).

Batman the hero is also “anonymous" (in the sense that people don’t know his true identity) and "synonymous" with "crime fighter" or "vigilante."

image

What’s up with “less” and “fewer”?

image

In recent years, many corporations, including Microsoft, Starbucks, Tesco, and Mercedes-Benz, have famously struggled with the difference between “less" and "fewer.” Therefore, it is little wonder that thousands of individuals also struggle with this concept.

The rule, however, is very simple:

image

This rule applies to everything except time, distance, and money. In those cases, “less" is used even though they can be counted or measured.

  • I spent less than 15 minutes on my essay.
  • The race-car driver began to celebrate when he was less than 100 feet from the finish line.
  • I paid less than $5 for my new tattoo; what do you think?

image

Read More

What’s up with “irony” and “paradox”?

Let’s take a look at paradox.

image

Irony is one of the most misunderstood (and misused) terms in English.

Basically, irony is the contrast between expectation and outcome.

Unfortunately, numerous people think that “irony” is the same thing as “humor,” “coincidence,” or “bad timing.” This misunderstanding is due, in part, to the influence of Alanis Morissette and “Ironic,” her hit song from 1996.

In the song, Morissette sings about several so-called “ironic” scenariosnone of which are ironic at all. It is, in fact, ironic that a song called “Ironic” has no valid examples of irony.

image

There is nothing intrinsically ironic about rain falling on someone’s wedding day; it’s happened before, and it will happen again. It can happen to anyone, and when it does happen, we can dismiss it as bad luck, bad timing, and an unfortunate coincidence.

image

It is ironic because you went beyond the call of duty to pick a date on which it was virtually guaranteed that it wouldn’t rain … and it turned out to be the only day it rained during that month. Ironically, if you had picked a random day, your wedding might not have been ruined.

Clearly, the outcome was the opposite of what was expected.

image

Read More

Back to Top

Twitter

Previous Next
Back to Top

Likes

Previous Next
Back to Top

Got a question?

Previous Next
Back to Top

Submit something cool

Previous Next
Back to Top

Instagram

Previous Next
Load More Photos
Back to Top

Vanity by Pixel Union